Copyright

All photo's are Copyright of Scott Swalling or the tagged Photographer. (Background photo Scott Swalling Photography).

About Me:

24Hr MTBike racer and general bike rider, climber and mountaineer. Good coffee drinker and cake eater (any cake, seriously, don't leave your cake laying around). Also, I like to try new things that challenge me.

Monday, 7 August 2017

Sonder Camino Ti by Alpkit

Sometime ago,as part of the Sonder Bikes marketing photo shoot and video, I as fortunate enough to ride the Sonder Camino Ti.  It is rare I jump on a bike and want to buy one with in a few minutes.  But with the exception of the SRAM components I really wanted to own one.

Being more incline to build a bespoke Camino Ti, the time came for me to order my rolling chassis (frame, fork, and wheels) and strip down the old KR810 for components.  Below is the bespoke build of my Camino.

All good things start with a nice frame with smooth welds as shown below. Campagnolo (Campag) BB, Thompson seat post and Campag front mech hanger installed.


 Next a Hope headset, Wolf Tooth Components steerer spacers, Easton EA90 stem and SLX bars.



Campag Chorus crankset and 53/44 chain rings, Chorus front and rear mech.


Stopping power provided by TRP HY/RD, with Alligator discs (not pictured).  Originally had planned to use TRP Spyre.  However, on fitting I found that even when shimmed, the clearance provided by the disc mount on the Love Mud hub was at least 1.5mm less (when I measured) than that of Hope hubs and the actuator on the inner side of the break would collide with the spokes.  My MonsterX now adorns the Spyres (possibly the best mechanical disc break on the market).


Next Specialized 143 Toupe saddle, Chorus shifters and Hudz hoods, Love Mud Orbit wheels, Ultegra 11/28 11spd cassette (this works seamlessly with the Campag and was required as the Love Mud hubs don't have a Campag free hub option at present) shod with WTB Riddler 47c tyres (these tyres are brilliant for gravel, cross, beach racing and mixed commuting, so good I got a set for the MonsterX) and Hope skewers.



Looking alright (steerer is now cut down to correct size, I needed to ride it both off road and on to find a flexible set of spacers with steerer cut to a sensible length).

Finally, some cables, Specliazed bar tape and bottle cages, Campag 11spd chain, Shimano XT pedals (Look KEO for the road) and the aforementioned Alligator 160mm discs.


Ride Report:

I have been riding the Camino Ti in road or gravel guise for the past 5 months and I can safely say it hasn't disappointed one bit. It is agile and fast across the terrain it is designed for.  Very comfortable and ensured my body didn't suffer much at all during the Dirty Reiver 200 this year.  It accelerates well off and on road, and with the 28c Specialized Rubaix tyres it is brilliant on the rough and often grot covered roads of Surrey and Hampshire.  It is a little heavier than the Enigma and Seven bikes, but that would be it's only drawback I can see against these brands having ridden and researched them over the years.  But is a fun, fast and comfortable frame set and the Love Mud wheel set is reliable despite the tiny issue with break fitting I encountered.

Sonder has a range of SRAM and Shimano options for complete bikes, and have built a couple bespoke versions as well, of course there is always the the build your own from their great frame and fork set.

It is a bike I feel confident on and off road, happy cruising or sitting on the rivet.  The Camino Ti is a great bike and has a little brother now in the Camino AL.  Both are worth researching and contacting Sonder (Alpkit) about.

Pack testing for the DR200.







Monday, 5 June 2017

Gravel Race Double Up

Double the Gravel

 
Dirt Reiver 200:
On the 21st of April Nick T and I headed for Kielder Forest, well the castle to be more precise, the sign on for the Dirty Reiver 200 a 200km gravel race in starting in the Kielder Forest and doing large figure of eight type route around Kielder and the surrounding areas around the Scottish Borders.

After a long casual drive we made it to the castle, had time to sign on and chat to some old friends then beat a quick retreat to our campsite and the hotel in Bellingham for dinner.

Back at the campsite after dinner we prepared our bikes, loaded them with spares and food, and made sure they still worked.

In the morning after a fitful sleep we ate, loaded the van and headed of the Kielder Castle for the start.  Loads of people had already lined up and we found ourselves towards the back.  Soon enough we rolled off towards the start gates.  Once through gates, Nick and I started to weave through the throngs as the first climb steadily lead us into 200km of excellent gravel route.

Soon Nick had to ease off as he was feeling unwell and he would eventually choose to complete the 130 instead of the 200 and was waiting when I returned happy and determine to return next year.

As I continued the field would thin out and I would get to ride and chat with some great people and some friends. An unscheduled toilet stop followed by a puncture which sealed quickly, but required some more air to be pumped into my rear tyre broke my rhythm, but I was ticking over again soon.


The nature of the route was pretty much up, down and a little bit of flat.  After each feed station the difficulty of the route seemed to increase.  After the last food stop, there were two more major climbs and then the route undulated around Lake Kielder and back to Kielder Castle for the finish.

However, it the top of the last major climb, my front wheel tyre flatted, after quickly repairing it the wheel was back in the fork.  At this point it went tiny bit wrong, my quick release would not tighten back up. After 20-30 minutes of faff and noticing the thread had worn, I managed to force the QR up tight and then would play a game of don't get a front puncture.  On fast gravel descents, this was difficult and at one point almost ended with me if a ditch after a very large and bum tightening 2 wheel drift (the sort on a MTB you would love).

I continued to watch the ground closely for sharp or square edge objects all the way to the castle and the finish. A beer, some soup and a big thanks to Paul Errignton, his happy helpers and the FC staff on my return and I was done. Smile on my face and I will return.

Not unhappy with that time all things considered and should be easily bettered next year.

Sonder Bikes (Alpkit) has designed and produced one hell off a good bike in the Camino Ti, it was the perfect bike for the event and I will do a build blog abut my Camino build very soon.

Grave Dash 100 - it's not a race:
The following Sunday was the Gravel Dash 100 (mile) founded and ran by infamous Charlie the bike monger and his band of merry elves.  A great bunch of velofiles and Dorset dwellers.

After a couple of drinks with Crispin the night before and a rocky night in the van on the foreshore in Swanage, thanks to the howling winds. It was wake up, get food and coffee and ready for the off.


I had no look at the route a great deal, but enough to know that riding it single speed I had to at least change my rear sprocket which I had to something a little lighter.  This was a good plan, whilst there was less climbing, the climbs were quite a bit steeper.  Especially the first hill hit once we left the road out of Swanage, I tried to clear it, but thought better of it about half way up, only 2 others would have me off walking, both at the hill fort sites.

For the first part the route undulated and took in some magnificent views, many from the tops of the numerous coastal cliffs in the Dorset region. Eventually we turned inland and the route flattened out a little.  By this time I had passed or been passed by Carla (the first woman home on the day) and would ride with her and a chap called James for a number of kilometers.

As it seems to be tradition my rear slider decided it would loosen off and force me to stop.  This did this multiple times and I eventually went gorilla on it and wanged the bolts up super tight, way beyond torque.  This fixed this problem and I found my rhythm again and tapped out the ks, through forest road and single track, cow path and over hill ridge. Belting along lose gravel paths with others and over the field of 1000 really bloody annoying bumps. Not long before this I had joined Carla and James again briefly, but sped away on a descent.

Relief came in the form of several ks on road and a surprise addition of a water, cake and beer stop at 80ks (half way).  Some water, a laugh with the guys there and being rejoined by Carla and I was off again.  Legs, no w feeling it, but some urgency as I was now in to the last half of the course and soon a large flat section (leads to the hill forts).

Once at the hill forts after riding with a small group I broke the elastic to them and snuck away.  A little bit of hike a bike at the first fort and then more of the same at the second then things would flatten out again.  Again the views had been amazing.

No I sped along the flats, through forest and over some heath land, some more forest and then back onto a coastal path, that followed the cliff tops towards Swanage, rounding a bluff you could see Swanage, roughly 15ks away, but with one more bluff and the finally climb to conquer.

As I approached this, I was cheered on by several walkers as I passed and very slowly made my way to the top of the final ridge line, a kilometer or 2 along here and it was all down hill. Off down the loose path Charlie had warned us about, low of the drops, saddle up my butt, I only paused for a second to choose which of the 4 deep chutes to take as an old couple sat on a bench a couple of feet away enjoying a cuppa.

Down through this, into Swanage and back to the Red Lion for cider and food and to hear tales of heroics and drink more cider.

I came home as the first single speed rider and feeling surprisingly OK.  Even a tubleless tyre repair at 30k to go minutes after a passing shower had soaked me, had not slowed me or dampened (pun intended) my spirits.

The Surly Karate Monkey that Phil Moore had encourage me to get and sourced and gave advice on the best build had finally had a proper hit out and it had been totally awesome.  Thanks Phil.


The KM post GD100 fun.

Chalie and Crew, thanks, what an excellent low key, fun event, long may it last.
Thanks to The Red Lion for having us and a fantastic cider selection.

Alpkit, Wolf Tooth and Surrey Hills Cyclworks, thanks again for your support and great products.

Gravel racing is ace!

#bemoremike






Thursday, 4 August 2016

Pure Bike Degreaser (Weldtite)

Hi all,
A short review of Pure Bike Degreaser from Weldtite.


It is not secret I am a fan of many of the Weldtite products, those who know me a bit better also know that I try to do my bit to not trash the environment too much either when enjoying my riding, around the home or in general day-to-day life.

So finding a degreaser that is made from natural, renewable and biodegradable substances and actually works well is a good find in my book and I have been using it for a couple of years now.

The Pure Bike Degreaser is not only better for the environment it does do a very good job of cleaning the drive train and anything else that get grotty when riding, cleaning and rebuilding bikes.  I have used it to clean bikes after long wet over night rides, where just about everything ends up stuck to the drive train, after races in mud sticky enough it clogs you rear cassette completely (we have all been there).

A simple wetting down of the drive train (or other affected area) a couple of sprays, let it sit and penetrate for a while, agitate the area with brush and let it sit a little longer then scrub of and wash rinse off.  For really thick muck I find going over it twice seems to get a good clean result.  Obviously using a half decent chain/drive train brush which Weldtite produce.

I can highly recommend this degreaser, also works well on clothes and hands.